LaGuardia Airport FLOODS on NYC’s wettest day ever: Stunned passengers are seen wading through terminal only to find subway also suspended as city buckles under EIGHT INCHES of rain

LaGuardia Airport FLOODS on NYC’s wettest day ever: Stunned passengers are seen wading through terminal only to find subway also suspended as city buckles under EIGHT INCHES of rain


New York City is on track to register the most rain every for a single day ever, with as many as eight inches expected later on Friday, as the city’s roads have already turned to rivers and flash floods submerged LaGuardia airport.

The rain, a hangover from Tropical Storm Ophelia, is some of the worst seen in New York City since Hurricane Ida in 2021, when 13 people drowned in basement apartments after being caught off-guard. 

‘Today’s weather isn’t done with us yet. We might see up to eight inches of rain by tomorrow morning,’ Mayor Eric Adams warned as he issued a travel advisory until Saturday at 6am. Manhattan Borough President Mark Levine said the city is on track to register its wettest day ever. The current record is 8.28inches in a single day. 

Some 23million people are now under a flood warning across the tri-state area and entire streets in Brooklyn are underwater, with governor Kathy Hochul declaring a state of emergency.

Terminal A at LaGuardia has been closed due to weather conditions, with footage shared online showing the waiting area under water, and New York’s John F Kennedy airport already recorded nearly eight inches of rain since midnight, breaking the previous record for the wettest day.

New York’s John F Kennedy airport already recorded nearly eight inches of rain since midnight, breaking the previous record for the wettest day 

Some 23million people are now under a flood warning across the tri-state area and entire streets in Brooklyn are underwater. Terminal A at LaGuardia has been closed due to weather conditions

Some 23million people are now under a flood warning across the tri-state area and entire streets in Brooklyn are underwater. Terminal A at LaGuardia has been closed due to weather conditions

Terminal A at LaGuardia airport is seen above on Friday afternoon

Terminal A at LaGuardia airport is seen above on Friday afternoon

People wait for the bus in Brooklyn as trains get cancelled due to flooding from heavy rains 

Images of the park show the iconic area completely under water after it's registered a total of 5.46 inches

Images of the park show the iconic area completely under water after it’s registered a total of 5.46 inches

New York City has declared a state of emergency as the city prepares to be dumped with up to seven inches of rain on Friday. New York City Department of Environmental Protection workers attempt to clear blocked drains after heavy rains

New York City has declared a state of emergency as the city prepares to be dumped with up to seven inches of rain on Friday. New York City Department of Environmental Protection workers attempt to clear blocked drains after heavy rains

The NYC subway is almost entirely suspended and buses in Brooklyn took on water as they tried to wade through the floods. The state is arranging how to get children home from school, with work being done to try to get buses and trains running before they’re dismissed. 

By noon, most of New York City had crossed the five inches of rainfall mark, with southern Brooklyn getting the worst of it, 6.78 inches.

Almost two inches of rain fell in Manhattan ‘s Central Park in just one hour, which makes it the wettest hour there in 80 years, as reported by CNN. Images of the park show the iconic area completely under water after it’s registered a total of 5.46 inches.

The rainfall, which has already reached a rate of one to two inches an hour, significantly affected the morning commutes of millions of New Yorkers, with social media users sharing footage of the chaotic scene across the area, including shocking video of a flooded subway stations and buses. 

New York City 's roads have turned to rivers as the tri-state area is hit with record rainfall. Special Operations Unit rescue personnel with the Westchester County Emergency Services paddle in rafts as they check buildings for victims trapped in heavy flooding

New York City ‘s roads have turned to rivers as the tri-state area is hit with record rainfall. Special Operations Unit rescue personnel with the Westchester County Emergency Services paddle in rafts as they check buildings for victims trapped in heavy flooding

A car is pushed through flooded streets in the Red Hook neighborhood in  Brooklyn

A car is pushed through flooded streets in the Red Hook neighborhood in  Brooklyn 

The downpour is expected to continue into Saturday and soak the tri-state area, with the National Weather Service calling it dangerous and life-threatening, and extending a flood watch from 2am on Friday through the night. 

Commissioner of New York City’s Office of Emergency Management Zach Iscol said Friday was ‘the wettest day we’ve had since Hurricane Ida swept this city.’

The area from Central New Jersey to Manhattan, Long Island and into Southern Connecticut and the Hudson Valley are forecast to see the most rainfall. Philadelphia and Boston could also see up to two inches of rain, and Hartford up to three inches or more.

While most of the tri-state area is expected to get three to five inches of rainfall, some areas further out from NYC’s five boroughs could get as much as seven. The counties of Nassau, Queens and Kings, which includes Brooklyn, are either experiencing flooding on Friday morning or expected to. 

Traffic makes its way through flood waters along the Brooklyn Queens Expressway on Friday

 Traffic makes its way through flood waters along the Brooklyn Queens Expressway on Friday

Other parts of the city has seen as much as five inches before 11am and subway services are largely suspended. Brooklyn flooding is pictured above

 Other parts of the city has seen as much as five inches before 11am and subway services are largely suspended. Brooklyn flooding is pictured above

A person walks away from his vehicle after it got stuck in high water on the Prospect Expressway

A person walks away from his vehicle after it got stuck in high water on the Prospect Expressway

‘I just spoke with about the flooding emergency in NYC. MTA is working hard to get the subway system rebooted and up and running again for evening rush. Another round of extreme rain in afternoon may complicate. Alternate buses may be deployed. More details soon,’ Manhattan Borough President Levine posted on X. 

Hochul’s office said it is deploying flood rescue teams to the Hudson Valley and Long Island. 

NYC officials sent an emergency alert to cellphones about 9.30am. It read: ‘A FLASH FLOOD WARNING is in effect for this area until 12:30pm EDT,” it read. “This is a dangerous and life-threatening situation. Do not attempt to travel unless you are fleeing an area subject to flooding or under an evacuation order.’ 

Amtrak services originating out of New York’s Penn Station have also been affected and may experience delays, Amtrak said on X. 

The rainfall has already reached a rate of one to two inches an hour

Brooklyn and Queens have been hit particularly hard this morning. Park Slope, Brooklyn is pictured above 

The potential flood threat can be dangerous for cities like New York, considering how Hurricane Ida drowned 11 including a two-year-old boy in their basement apartments in 2021. 

During Ida, the city experienced between six and ten inches of rain in 24 hours. Brooklyn resident Steve Kastenbaum posted a picture of the flooding in Flushing Avenue on Brooklyn, calling it ‘worse than Ida.’ 

The rain is supposed to lighten by Friday evening but will spill into Saturday morning. City officials issued a travel advisory starting at 4am Friday through 6am Saturday, warning potential ‘widespread travel impacts’ during the morning commute. 

The MTA said the rain will ‘inevitably’ cause issues in the subway system, and some routes have already been affected.

‘There are no 2/3/4/5 service in Brooklyn. We’ll provide more details shortly while we address water on the tracks in Brooklyn,; the MTA posted on Friday morning.

New York City was drenched on Friday as flash flooding hit the roads during rush hour and up to seven inches of rain are forecast.  The Prospect Expressway in Mamaroneck in Westchester County is pictured above

New York City was drenched on Friday as flash flooding hit the roads during rush hour and up to seven inches of rain are forecast.  The Prospect Expressway in Mamaroneck in Westchester County is pictured above

The potential flood threat can be dangerous, considering how Hurricane Ida drowned 11 including a two-year-old boy in their basement apartments in 2021. Queens pictured above

The potential flood threat can be dangerous, considering how Hurricane Ida drowned 11 including a two-year-old boy in their basement apartments in 2021. Queens pictured above

Hochul said earlier on Friday: ‘Brooklyn is seeing some of the heaviest impacts of this rainstorm — all Brooklynites should be extremely careful right now.’

The MTA tried to get ahead of the storm as workers started checking storm drains at the 157th Street subway station on Thursday. 

MTA Chair and CEO Janno Lieber said: ‘No matter what we do, there is going to be water in the subway system … The good news is this system is designed to take water and to pump it out in huge amounts,’ 

The MTA will monitor conditions and make repairs as needed throughout the storm after activating its 24-hour situation room. 

Lieber added in a statement: ‘This is a serious storm, and we’re taking it seriously.’ 

Even a mere inch of rain could lead to flooding in certain areas of NYC and nearby regions that still remain saturated from last weekend’s storm.

The MTA said the rain will 'inevitably' affect the subway systems, and some routes have already been affected. Brooklyn is pictured

The MTA said the rain will ‘inevitably’ affect the subway systems, and some routes have already been affected. Brooklyn is pictured

Mayor Eric Adams shared a warning about the severe weather expected in NYC

Mayor Eric Adams shared a warning about the severe weather expected in NYC

The downpours are occurring due to the remains of Tropical Storm Ophelia with converging winds located just to the north, Fox Weather meteorologist Greg Diamond told The Post. 

New Yorkers were warned to prepare to seek higher ground on Sunday as post-tropical cyclone Ophelia continued to hammer the East Coast with wet weather. 

Ophelia was a tropical storm at near-hurricane strength when it crashed down near Emerald Isle in North Carolina on September 24. 

It knocked out power and flooded coastal streets. States of emergency were declared last week in Virginia, North Carolina and Maryland.



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